The economic burden and symptom manifestations of chronic rhinosinusitis

Am J Rhinol. Jan-Feb 2003;17(1):27-32.

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to delineate patient symptoms and economic burdens of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS).

Methods: Adult patients with CRS were assessed prospectively with a survey instrument. Symptom scores for major and minor symptoms of CRS, medication use, physician visits for CRS, and work days missed were determined. Cost analyses were conducted.

Results: Three hundred twenty-two patients were studied prospectively (mean age, 42.3 years). Nasal obstruction and facial congestion were the most common and severe major symptoms, and headache and fatigue were the most common and severe minor symptoms. Patients received an average of 2.7 antibiotic courses and used nasal steroids and prescription antihistamines 18.3 and 16.3 weeks, respectively, in a 12-month period. Mean medical resource costs were 921 dollars per patient-year. CRS caused an average of 4.8 days of missed work per 12-month period. The overall yearly economic cost of CRS was 1539 dollars per patient.

Conclusion: Nasal and facial symptoms prevail over systemic and oropharyngeal symptoms in CRS. Significant medical resource expenditures and global economic costs accompany CRS.

Publication types

  • Evaluation Study

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Anti-Bacterial Agents / economics
  • Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use
  • Boston / epidemiology
  • Chronic Disease
  • Costs and Cost Analysis
  • Drug Prescriptions / economics
  • Histamine H1 Antagonists / economics
  • Histamine H1 Antagonists / therapeutic use
  • Humans
  • Middle Aged
  • Prevalence
  • Prospective Studies
  • Quality of Life
  • Rhinitis / drug therapy
  • Rhinitis / economics*
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Sinusitis / drug therapy
  • Sinusitis / economics*
  • Statistics as Topic
  • Steroids / economics
  • Steroids / therapeutic use
  • Surveys and Questionnaires

Substances

  • Anti-Bacterial Agents
  • Histamine H1 Antagonists
  • Steroids