Inherited risk factors for venous thromboembolism: implications for clinical practice

Clin Cornerstone. 2002;4(6):18-30. doi: 10.1016/s1098-3597(02)90033-5.

Abstract

Each year, thrombosis in the deep veins of the lower extremities occurs in 1 of every 1000 Americans (1). Although most cases of venous thrombosis are not fatal, death from pulmonary embolism can be expected in 1% to 2% of all patients, and as many as 25% of patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) will suffer the chronic effects of postthrombotic syndrome. Thus, identification of high-risk patients with genetic predispositions to thrombosis is an important clinical goal, particularly among individuals with recurrent DVT.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Activated Protein C Resistance / genetics
  • Anticoagulants / therapeutic use
  • Factor V / genetics
  • Homocysteine / blood
  • Humans
  • Models, Statistical
  • Point Mutation / genetics
  • Prevalence
  • Prothrombin / genetics
  • Recurrence
  • Risk Factors
  • Thromboembolism / blood
  • Thromboembolism / genetics*
  • Thromboembolism / prevention & control
  • Venous Thrombosis / blood
  • Venous Thrombosis / genetics*
  • Venous Thrombosis / prevention & control

Substances

  • Anticoagulants
  • factor V Leiden
  • Homocysteine
  • Factor V
  • Prothrombin