Effect of Roman chair exercise training on the development of lumbar extension strength

J Strength Cond Res. 2003 May;17(2):356-61. doi: 10.1519/1533-4287(2003)017<0356:eorcet>2.0.co;2.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 45 degrees Roman chair exercise training on the development of lumbar extension strength. Fifteen healthy volunteers (9 women, 6 men) were recruited from a university setting and were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups. One group (n = 9) performed progressive resistance back extension exercise on a 45 degrees Roman chair once weekly for 12 weeks. Training consisted of one set of 8-20 dynamic repetitions to volitional exhaustion using hand-held metal plates for additional resistance. The other group did not train (control, n = 6). Peak isometric lumbar extension torque was measured on a lumbar extension dynamometer before and after the 12-week program. Following training, peak isometric lumbar extension torque did not increase for the Roman chair group (before: 224.0 +/- 134.1 N x m; after: 240.3 +/- 137.4 N x m; p > 0.05) compared with the control group (before: 175.6 +/- 68.9 N x m; after: 178.2 +/- 69.9 N x m; p > 0.05), despite an increase in dynamic exercise load.

Publication types

  • Clinical Trial
  • Randomized Controlled Trial

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Analysis of Variance
  • Biomechanical Phenomena
  • Exercise Test
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Low Back Pain / prevention & control*
  • Lumbar Vertebrae / physiology*
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Muscle, Skeletal / physiology*
  • Physical Education and Training / methods*
  • Posture
  • Probability
  • Prospective Studies
  • Range of Motion, Articular / physiology
  • Risk Assessment
  • Sports Medicine / instrumentation*
  • Stress, Mechanical
  • Weight Lifting / physiology