Rethinking the socioeconomics and geography of tuberculosis among foreign-born residents of New Jersey, 1994-1999

Am J Public Health. 2003 Jun;93(6):1007-12. doi: 10.2105/ajph.93.6.1007.

Abstract

Objectives: This study investigated the socioeconomic profile of foreign-born tuberculosis patients in New Jersey.

Methods: Foreign- and US-born tuberculosis patients in 1994-1999 were compared using various measures of socioeconomic status.

Results: Out of 4295 tuberculosis patients, 2005 (47%) were foreign-born. Foreign-born patients resided in more affluent, more educated, and less crowded areas than did US-born patients (P <.005). They were also more likely to have been employed during the 2 years before diagnosis (62% vs 41%, P <.001). Private physicians treated the majority of South Asian-born patients.

Conclusions: Substantial numbers of employed foreign-born tuberculosis patients now reside in affluent New Jersey locations. Changes in tuberculosis control programs may be required when the socioeconomic status and place of residence of foreign-born populations diverge from traditional assumptions linking poverty with tuberculosis.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Asian Americans
  • Child
  • Crowding
  • Educational Status
  • Emigration and Immigration / classification
  • Emigration and Immigration / statistics & numerical data*
  • Employment / statistics & numerical data
  • Family Characteristics / ethnology
  • Geography
  • Global Health
  • Hispanic or Latino
  • Humans
  • Income / statistics & numerical data
  • Middle Aged
  • New Jersey / epidemiology
  • Private Practice / statistics & numerical data
  • Public Health Practice
  • Social Class
  • Socioeconomic Factors*
  • Tuberculosis / economics
  • Tuberculosis / ethnology*
  • Tuberculosis / prevention & control
  • United States / epidemiology