Cardiovascular control by the suprachiasmatic nucleus: neural and neuroendocrine mechanisms in human and rat

Biol Chem. 2003 May;384(5):697-709. doi: 10.1515/BC.2003.078.

Abstract

The risk for cardiovascular incidents is highest in the early morning, which seems partially due to endogenous factors. Endogenous circadian rhythms in mammalian physiology and behavior are regulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Recently, anatomical evidence has been provided that SCN functioning is disturbed in patients with essential hypertension. Here we review neural and neuroendocrine mechanisms by which the SCN regulates the cardiovascular system. First, we discuss evidence for an endogenous circadian rhythm in cardiac activity, both in humans and rats, which is abolished after SCN lesioning in rats. The immediate impact of retinal light exposure at night on SCN-output to the cardiovascular system, which signals 'day' in both diurnal (human) and nocturnal (rat) mammals with opposite effects on physiology, is discussed. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of melatonin treatment on the SCN and its potential medical relevance in patients with essential hypertension. Finally, we argue that regional differentiation of the SCN and autonomous nervous system is required to explain the multitude of circadian rhythms. Insights into the mechanisms by which the SCN affects the cardiovascular system may provide new strategies for the treatment of disease conditions known to coincide with circadian rhythm disturbances, as is presented for essential hypertension.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Autonomic Nervous System / physiology
  • Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena*
  • Circadian Rhythm / physiology
  • Heart Rate / physiology
  • Humans
  • Light
  • Melatonin / physiology
  • Neurosecretory Systems / physiology*
  • Rats
  • Suprachiasmatic Nucleus / physiology*

Substances

  • Melatonin