Peripheral Retinal Degenerations and the Risk of Retinal Detachment

Am J Ophthalmol. 2003 Jul;136(1):155-60. doi: 10.1016/s0002-9394(03)00144-2.

Abstract

Purpose: To review the degenerative diseases of the peripheral retina in relationship with the risk to develop a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and to present recommendations for use in eyes at increased risk of developing a retinal detachment.

Design: Focused literature review and author's clinical experience.

Results: Retinal degenerations are common lesions involving the peripheral retina, and most of them are clinically insignificant. Lattice degeneration, degenerative retinoschisis, cystic retinal tufts, and, rarely, zonular traction tufts, can result in a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Therefore, these lesions have been considered for prophylactic therapy; however, adequate studies have not been performed to date.

Conclusions: Well-designed, prospective, randomized clinical studies are necessary to determine the benefit-risk ratio of prophylactic treatment. In the meantime, the evidence available suggests that most of the peripheral retinal degenerations should not be treated except in rare, high-risk situations.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Humans
  • Retinal Degeneration / complications*
  • Retinal Detachment / epidemiology
  • Retinal Detachment / etiology*
  • Retinal Detachment / prevention & control
  • Risk Factors