The discrepancy between self-reported smoking status and urine continine levels among women enrolled in prenatal care at four publicly funded clinical sites

J Public Health Manag Pract. Jul-Aug 2003;9(4):322-5. doi: 10.1097/00124784-200307000-00011.

Abstract

The discrepancy between self-reported smoking behavior and actual urine cotinine values among prenatal patients at four municipally operated clinical sites was examined. Face-to-face interview and birth certificate information about smoking behavior during pregnancy was compared with laboratory urine cotinine values for 74 patients. Almost three of every four (73%) self-reported nonsmokers had continine values greater than 80 ng/mL; one-half (48%) had values exceeding 100 ng/mL. Self-reported prenatal smoking behavior seems to be an unreliable indicator of actual smoking status among low-income prenatal patients, resulting in missed opportunities to lower tobacco-related exposure/risk among women with the poorest birth outcomes.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Attitude to Health*
  • Community Health Centers / economics
  • Community Health Centers / organization & administration*
  • Cotinine / urine*
  • Deception
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Maternal Exposure
  • Middle Aged
  • Parity
  • Philadelphia / epidemiology
  • Pregnant Women / ethnology
  • Pregnant Women / psychology*
  • Prenatal Care / economics
  • Prenatal Care / organization & administration*
  • Prevalence
  • Public Health Administration*
  • Risk-Taking
  • Self Disclosure*
  • Smoking / epidemiology
  • Smoking / psychology
  • Smoking / urine*
  • Smoking Cessation
  • Urban Population

Substances

  • Cotinine