The ocular manifestations of the Sturge-Weber syndrome

J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. Nov-Dec 1992;29(6):349-56.

Abstract

Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a rare neuro-oculocutaneous disorder. The ocular component manifests as glaucoma and vascular malformations of the conjunctiva, episclera, choroid, and retina. The authors reviewed the records of and recalled for examination 51 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of SWS seen at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, from 1980 to 1991. Of the 51 patients, 36 (71%) had glaucoma, 26 experienced onset before 24 months of age and the remainder after 66 months of age, 35 (69%) had conjunctival or episcleral hemangiomas, and 28 (55%) had choroidal hemangiomas, which were bilateral in 12 patients. Other ocular manifestations (retinal vascular tortuosity, iris heterochromia, retinal detachment, and strabismus) also occurred. Thirty-four of 51 (67%) glaucomatous eyes had a final visual acuity of 20/40 or better, or central, steady, and maintained fixation in each eye.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Child
  • Eye Diseases / diagnosis*
  • Eye Diseases / therapy
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Fundus Oculi
  • Glaucoma / diagnosis
  • Glaucoma / therapy
  • Hemangioma / diagnosis
  • Hemangioma / therapy
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Male
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Sturge-Weber Syndrome / diagnosis*
  • Sturge-Weber Syndrome / therapy
  • Visual Acuity