The history, evolution, and clinical use of dendritic cell-based immunization strategies in the therapy of brain tumors

J Neurooncol. Aug-Sep 2003;64(1-2):161-76. doi: 10.1007/BF02700031.

Abstract

Despite advancements in therapeutic regimens, the prognosis remains poor for patients with malignant gliomas. Specificity has been an elusive goal for current modalities, but immunotherapy has emerged as a potential means of designing more tumor-specific treatments. Dendritic cells (DC) are the specialized antigen presenting cells of the immune system and have served now as a platform for therapeutic immunizations against such cancers as lymphoma, multiple myeloma, melanoma, prostate cancer, renal cell carcinoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, colon cancer, and even malignant gliomas. DC-based immunizations offer a number of advantages over traditional immunotherapeutic approaches to brain tumors, approaches that have proved promising despite concerns over central nervous system immune privilege and glioma-mediated immunosuppression. The future success of clinical trials will depend on the optimization and standardizing of procedures for DC generation, loading, and administration.

Publication types

  • Historical Article
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Brain Neoplasms / therapy*
  • Cancer Vaccines / history
  • Dendritic Cells / transplantation*
  • History, 20th Century
  • History, 21st Century
  • Humans
  • Immunotherapy* / history
  • Immunotherapy* / methods

Substances

  • Cancer Vaccines