Smoking and schizophrenia

Schizophr Res. 1992 Dec;8(2):93-102. doi: 10.1016/0920-9964(92)90024-y.

Abstract

Several studies have shown that patients with schizophrenia have an extremely high prevalence of smoking, almost 90%, compared to only 33% in the general population and 45-70% in patients with other psychiatric diagnoses. The reasons for the high prevalence of smoking among schizophrenics is unknown, but it is likely that smoking behavior in schizophrenia may be a complex process, related to numerous interrelationships between the psychopathological, biochemical, and neuropharmacological aspects of smoking and of schizophrenia.

Publication types

  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Antipsychotic Agents / administration & dosage
  • Antipsychotic Agents / adverse effects
  • Dopamine / physiology
  • Dyskinesia, Drug-Induced / physiopathology
  • Dyskinesia, Drug-Induced / psychology
  • Humans
  • Nicotine / administration & dosage
  • Nicotine / adverse effects
  • Receptors, Nicotinic / drug effects
  • Receptors, Nicotinic / physiology
  • Schizophrenia / drug therapy
  • Schizophrenia / physiopathology*
  • Schizophrenic Psychology*
  • Smoking / adverse effects
  • Smoking / physiopathology*
  • Smoking / psychology

Substances

  • Antipsychotic Agents
  • Receptors, Nicotinic
  • Nicotine
  • Dopamine