Uses and limitations of spoiled gradient-refocused imaging in the evaluation of suspected intracranial tumors

Top Magn Reson Imaging. 1992 Sep;4(4):7-16.

Abstract

This article describes the use of a radiofrequency-spoiled gradient-recalled (SPGR) imaging pulse sequence in the evaluation of intracranial masses. This pulse sequence provides excellent anatomic detail with T1-weighted image contrast. Rapid, sequential, single-slice (two-dimensional) images of the brain can be obtained in patients who are unable to hold still for long periods of time. In addition, volumetric (three-dimensional) image data sets can be obtained that provide extremely thin (1- to 2-mm) sections of high detail and good signal-to-noise ratio for selected critical structures within the brain. Finally, because SPGR is also utilized for time-of-flight angiography, parenchymal information can be obtained simultaneously with cerebral blood vessel definition. One potential pitfall that the magnetic resonance radiologist must be aware of is the fact that, in many patients, the degree of contrast enhancement is greatly diminished on postgadolinium SPGR images compared with conventional spin-echo T1-weighted images. Comparison with a set of standard spin-echo postcontrast images or, potentially, the use of higher doses of gadolinium may solve this problem. In spite of this limitation, the selective utilization of SPGR imaging can yield additional useful information for evaluation and preoperative planning in patients with intracranial masses.

MeSH terms

  • Brain Neoplasms / diagnosis*
  • Contrast Media
  • Gadolinium
  • Gadolinium DTPA
  • Humans
  • Image Enhancement / methods
  • Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods*
  • Organometallic Compounds
  • Pentetic Acid

Substances

  • Contrast Media
  • Organometallic Compounds
  • Pentetic Acid
  • Gadolinium
  • Gadolinium DTPA