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, 35 (5), 258-62

The 2001 Giessen Cohort Study on Patients With Prostatitis Syndrome--An Evaluation of Inflammatory Status and Search for Microorganisms 10 Years After a First Analysis

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  • PMID: 14535851

The 2001 Giessen Cohort Study on Patients With Prostatitis Syndrome--An Evaluation of Inflammatory Status and Search for Microorganisms 10 Years After a First Analysis

H Schneider et al. Andrologia.

Abstract

During the last years tremendous changes have occurred in the epidemiologic knowledge and the diagnostic process of the prostatitis syndrome. A new worldwide-accepted classification system has become the gold standard in contemporary literature. The aim of this study was to compare the inflammatory and infectious status of men with prostatitis syndrome with results from our study cohort from 1992. A total of 168 symptomatic men (mean age 43.2 years; range 18-79) attending the Giessen prostatitis outpatient department were included. All men underwent a standard four-glass-test including leucocyte analysis in all specimens. A routine search for Ureaplasma urealyticum and Chlamydia trachomatis was performed. Ejaculate analysis following World Health Organization (WHO) criteria has been performed including the evaluation of increased number of peroxidase-positive leucocytes (PPL). Men were classified according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) prostatitis classification. The distribution of patients according to NIH criteria is as follows: NIH II (4.2%), NIH IIIA (31.5%), NIH IIIB (50.0%) and urethroprostatitis (14.3%). Chlamydial infection was present in one man (0.6%). Only two men with increased leucocytes in prostatic secretions demonstrated > or =106 million ml-1 PPL in semen. As compared with our cohort study 10 years ago, the proportion of the different subtypes of the prostatitis syndrome have remained stable. The aetiological spectrum of chronic bacterial prostatitis has not changed whereas, in contrast, the prevalence of C. trachomatis now is found to be strikingly reduced. Using the WHO cutpoints for leucocytospermia the inclusion of seminal leucocytes to the diagnostic process has not influenced the distribution between inflammatory (type NIH IIIA) and noninflammatory (type NIH IIIB) chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

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