Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Review
, 64 (7), 1179-86

Why Are Grape/Fresh Wine Anthocyanins So Simple and Why Is It That Red Wine Color Lasts So Long?

Affiliations
Review

Why Are Grape/Fresh Wine Anthocyanins So Simple and Why Is It That Red Wine Color Lasts So Long?

R Brouillard et al. Phytochemistry.

Abstract

Vitis vinifera red berries are characterized by anthocyanins whose chemical structures are among the simplest encountered in higher plants. On the contrary, many plants, including orchids, petunias, red cabbage, elderberries, potatoes for instance, have developed very complicated anthocyanins featuring side-chains at the available positions of the aglycone skeleton. Such pigments were shown to possess bio-physico-chemical properties not to be seen with the grape common anthocyanins. Among beverages (water, tea, beer, wine, coffee, juices, milk), red wine is the only one whose organoleptic properties improve with time and this is called ageing. The grape/fresh red wine pigments, after a few months, disappear from the wine giving birth to new pigments resulting from the wine spontaneous chemistry allowing it to remain red for many years. What are the wine pigments and why are they so stable is the purpose of this mini-review. The structural simplicity of grape anthocyanins and the long lasting colour of red wine is another French paradox; we call it French paradox II.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 8 PubMed Central articles

See all "Cited by" articles

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback