Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Clinical Trial
, 55 (1), 13-8

The Effect of Spinal Cord Stimulation in Patients With Chronic Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy: Two Years' Follow-Up of the Randomized Controlled Trial

Affiliations
Clinical Trial

The Effect of Spinal Cord Stimulation in Patients With Chronic Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy: Two Years' Follow-Up of the Randomized Controlled Trial

Marius A Kemler et al. Ann Neurol.

Abstract

Chronic reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a painful, disabling disorder for which no treatment with proven effect is available. We performed a randomized trial in a 2 to 1 ratio of patients, in which 36 patients were treated with spinal cord stimulation and physical therapy (SCS+PT), and 18 patients received solely PT. Twenty-four SCS+PT patients were given a permanent spinal cord stimulation system after successful test stimulation; the remaining 12 patients received no permanent system. We assessed pain intensity, global perceived effect, functional status, and health-related quality of life. Patients were examined before randomization, before implantation, and also at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months thereafter. At 2 years, three patients were excluded from the analysis. The intention-to-treat analysis showed improvements in the SCS+PT group concerning pain intensity (-2.1 vs 0.0 cm; p < 0.001) and global perceived effect (43% vs 6% "much improved"; p = 0.001). There was no clinically important improvement of functional status. Health-related quality of life improved only in the group receiving spinal cord stimulation. After careful selection and successful test stimulation, spinal cord stimulation results in a long-term pain reduction and health-related quality of life improvement in chronic reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

Comment in

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 27 PubMed Central articles

See all "Cited by" articles

Publication types

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback