Effectiveness of individually tailored calendars in promoting childhood immunization in urban public health centers

Am J Public Health. 2004 Jan;94(1):122-7. doi: 10.2105/ajph.94.1.122.

Abstract

Objectives: We examined the effectiveness of tailored calendars in increasing childhood immunization rates.

Methods: Parents of babies aged birth to 1 year (n = 321) received individually tailored calendars promoting immunization from 2 urban public health centers. For each baby, an age- and sex-matched control was selected from the same center. Immunization status was tracked through age 24 months.

Results: A higher proportion of intervention than of control babies were up to date at the end of a 9-month enrollment period (82% vs 65%, P <.001) and at age 24 months (66% vs 47%, P <.001). The younger the baby's age at enrollment in the program, the greater was the intervention effect.

Conclusions: Tailored immunization calendars can help increase child immunization rates.

Publication types

  • Evaluation Study
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • African Americans / education
  • African Americans / psychology
  • Case-Control Studies
  • Community Health Centers / organization & administration
  • Female
  • Health Education / methods*
  • Humans
  • Immunization Programs / organization & administration*
  • Immunization Programs / statistics & numerical data*
  • Immunization Schedule*
  • Infant
  • Infant Care / standards*
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Male
  • Missouri
  • Parents / education*
  • Parents / psychology
  • Program Evaluation
  • Reminder Systems*
  • Social Marketing*
  • Teaching Materials
  • Urban Health Services / organization & administration