Moyamoya angiopathy with dolichoectatic internal carotid arteries, patent ductus arteriosus and pupillary dysfunction: a new genetic syndrome?

Eur Neurol. 2004;51(2):72-7. doi: 10.1159/000076248. Epub 2004 Jan 16.

Abstract

We report on 2 children with moyamoya angiopathy and bilateral dolichoectatic internal carotid arteries in combination with iris hypoplasia with bilateral fixed dilated pupils and a history of patent ductus arteriosus. Both were symptomatic with moyamoya angiopathy and underwent bilateral extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass operations for cerebral revascularization. This is the first report on moyamoya angiopathy and bilateral dolichoectatic internal carotid arteries with simultaneous occurrence of ocular and cardiovascular malformations. There have been descriptions of cerebral vascular abnormalities in combination with either congenital heart disease or ocular abnormalities but not with both presenting together. The combination of these separate congenital developmental defects may not be purely coincidental: we propose that the 2 probands are affected with a not yet recognized clinical syndrome of probably genetic etiology.

Publication types

  • Case Reports

MeSH terms

  • Carotid Artery, Internal / diagnostic imaging
  • Carotid Artery, Internal / physiopathology*
  • Carotid Artery, Internal / surgery
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Ductus Arteriosus, Patent / complications*
  • Ductus Arteriosus, Patent / pathology
  • Ductus Arteriosus, Patent / surgery
  • Endarterectomy, Carotid / methods
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Magnetic Resonance Angiography / methods
  • Male
  • Moyamoya Disease / complications*
  • Moyamoya Disease / pathology
  • Moyamoya Disease / surgery
  • Myocardial Revascularization / methods
  • Pupil Disorders / complications*
  • Pupil Disorders / pathology
  • Pupil Disorders / surgery
  • Radiography
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency / complications*
  • Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency / pathology
  • Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency / surgery