Extracellular pressure stimulates macrophage phagocytosis by inhibiting a pathway involving FAK and ERK

Am J Physiol Cell Physiol. 2004 Jun;286(6):C1358-66. doi: 10.1152/ajpcell.00553.2003. Epub 2004 Feb 4.

Abstract

We hypothesized that changes in extracellular pressure during inflammation or infection regulate macrophage phagocytosis through modulating the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-ERK pathway. Undifferentiated (monocyte-like) or PMA-differentiated (macrophage-like) THP-1 cells were incubated at 37 degrees C with serum-opsonized latex beads under ambient or 20-mmHg increased pressure. Pressure did not affect monocyte phagocytosis but significantly increased macrophage phagocytosis (29.9 +/- 1.8 vs. 42.0 +/- 1.6%, n = 9, P < 0.001). THP-1 macrophages constitutively expressed activated FAK, ERK, and Src. Exposure of macrophages to pressure decreased ERK and FAK-Y397 phosphorylation (77.6 +/- 7.9%, n = 7, P < 0.05) but did not alter FAK-Y576 or Src phosphorylation. FAK small interfering RNA (SiRNA) reduced FAK expression by >75% and the basal amount of phosphorylated FAK by 25% and significantly increased basal macrophage phagocytosis (P < 0.05). Pressure inhibited FAK-Y397 phosphorylation in mock-transfected or scrambled SiRNA-transfected macrophages, but phosphorylated FAK was not significantly reduced further by pressure in cells transfected with FAK SiRNA. Pressure increased phagocytosis in all three groups. However, FAK-SiRNA-transfected cells exhibited only 40% of the pressure effect on phagocytosis observed in scrambled SiRNA-transfected cells so that phagocytosis inversely paralleled FAK activation. PD-98059 (50 microM), an ERK activation inhibitor, increased basal phagocytosis (26.9 +/- 1.8 vs. 31.7 +/- 1.1%, n = 15, P < 0.05), but pressure did not further increase phagocytosis in PD-98059-treated cells. Pressure also inhibited ERK activation after mock transfection or transfection with scrambled SiRNA, but transfection of FAK SiRNA abolished ERK inhibition by pressure. Pressure did not increase phagocytosis in MonoMac-1 cells that do not express FAK. Increased extracellular pressure during infection or inflammation enhances macrophage phagocytosis by inhibiting FAK and, consequently, decreasing ERK activation.

Publication types

  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Cell Line
  • Enzyme Inhibitors / pharmacology
  • Extracellular Fluid / physiology*
  • Feedback, Physiological / genetics
  • Focal Adhesion Kinase 1
  • Focal Adhesion Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
  • Humans
  • Infections / physiopathology
  • Inflammation / physiopathology
  • Macrophages / drug effects
  • Macrophages / enzymology
  • Macrophages / physiology*
  • Mechanotransduction, Cellular / drug effects
  • Mechanotransduction, Cellular / physiology*
  • Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3
  • Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases / genetics
  • Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases / metabolism*
  • Phagocytosis / drug effects
  • Phagocytosis / physiology*
  • Phosphorylation
  • Pressure
  • Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / genetics
  • Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / metabolism*
  • RNA, Small Interfering / genetics
  • Transfection
  • Up-Regulation / physiology

Substances

  • Enzyme Inhibitors
  • RNA, Small Interfering
  • Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
  • Focal Adhesion Kinase 1
  • Focal Adhesion Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
  • PTK2 protein, human
  • Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3
  • Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases