Weight distribution of below-knee amputee and able-bodied children during standing

Prosthet Orthot Int. 1992 Dec;16(3):200-2. doi: 10.3109/03093649209164341.

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to compare weight distributions of a relatively large number of below-knee (BK) amputee and able-bodied children during two different standing positions. Twenty-one BK amputees and 200 able-bodied children volunteered as subjects for this investigation. Each child stood on a pressure plate and three sets of trial data were collected. One set of trial data was collected with both feet together on the pressure plate and two were collected with feet placed 20cm apart. The total force applied by each foot to the pressure plate was normalised by dividing by subject weight to yield foot force to body weight ratios. Data were separated into forefoot and rearfoot areas, force for the forefoot area was then calculated and normalised by dividing by total foot force to yield forefoot to whole-foot force ratios. Ratios for the two foot placement conditions and for non-prosthetic, prosthetic, dominant, and non-dominant feet were compared using paired t-tests (p < 0.05). Results indicated that: 1) BK amputee children placed more weight on their non-prosthetic limb than their prosthetic limb, yet this was not different from able-bodied children in respect of weight distribution between dominant and non-dominant limbs; 2) approximately 90% of the load on the prosthetic foot was placed on the forefoot; and 3) the load on the non-prosthetic foot was evenly distributed between the forefoot and rearfoot like that of able-bodied children. It was concluded that except for substantially more weight on the forefoot of the prosthetic leg BK amputee children stood in the same way as able-bodied children.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Amputation / methods
  • Amputation / rehabilitation*
  • Artificial Limbs*
  • Body Weight*
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Female
  • Foot
  • Humans
  • Knee
  • Male
  • Posture*
  • Pressure