THE OXIDATIVE BURST IN PLANT DISEASE RESISTANCE

Annu Rev Plant Physiol Plant Mol Biol. 1997 Jun;48:251-275. doi: 10.1146/annurev.arplant.48.1.251.

Abstract

Rapid generation of superoxide and accumulation of H2O2 is a characteristic early feature of the hypersensitive response following perception of pathogen avirulence signals. Emerging data indicate that the oxidative burst reflects activation of a membrane-bound NADPH oxidase closely resembling that operating in activated neutrophils. The oxidants are not only direct protective agents, but H2O2 also functions as a substrate for oxidative cross-linking in the cell wall, as a threshold trigger for hypersensitive cell death, and as a diffusible signal for induction of cellular protectant genes in surrounding cells. Activation of the oxidative burst is a central component of a highly amplified and integrated signal system, also involving salicylic acid and perturbations of cytosolic Ca2+, which underlies the expression of disease-resistance mechanisms.