Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
. 2004 Sep;58(9):1211-6.
doi: 10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601948.

High Intakes of Skimmed Milk, but Not Meat, Increase Serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 in Eight-Year-Old Boys

Affiliations

High Intakes of Skimmed Milk, but Not Meat, Increase Serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 in Eight-Year-Old Boys

C Hoppe et al. Eur J Clin Nutr. .

Abstract

Objective: To examine whether a high protein intake (PI) from either milk or meat, at a level often seen in late infancy, could increase s-IGF-I and s-IGF-I/s-IGFBP-3 in healthy, prepubertal children. IGF-I levels are positively associated with growth velocity in children and some studies suggest that a high animal PI can stimulate growth. During protein deprivation IGF-I decrease, but it is unknown whether a high PI can increase s-IGF-I in well-nourished children.

Design: In all, 24 8-y-old boys were asked to take either 1.5 l of skimmed milk (n = 12) or the same amount of protein as 250 g low fat meat (n = 12) daily for 7 days. The remaining diet they could choose freely. At baseline and after 7 days, anthropometrical variables were measured, diet was registered (3-day weighed records), and s-IGF-I and s-IGFBP-3 (RIA) were determined after fast.

Results: PI increased by 61% in the milk group to 4.0 g/kg/day (P < 0.0001) and by 54% in the meat group to 3.8 g/kg/day (P = 0.001). The high milk intake increased s-IGF-I by 19% (P = 0.001) and s-IGF-I/s-IGFBP-3 by 13% (P < 0.0001). There were no increases in the meat group.

Conclusions: High intake of milk and not meat, increased concentrations of s-IGF-I and s-IGF-I/s-IGFBP-3 significantly. Compounds in milk and not a high PI as such seem to stimulate IGF-I. This might explain the positive effect of milk intake on growth seen in some studies.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 43 articles

See all "Cited by" articles

Substances

Feedback