[Bacterial pathogens, resistance patterns and treatment options in community acquired pediatric urinary tract infection]

Klin Padiatr. Mar-Apr 2004;216(2):83-6. doi: 10.1055/s-2004-823143.
[Article in German]

Abstract

Background: Epidemiology and resistance patterns of bacterial pathogens in pediatric UTI show large interregional variability and rates of bacterial resistances are changing due to different antibiotic treatment. We intended to evaluate data from northern Germany.

Patients and methods: In 100 children (53 female, 47 male, mean age 4.4 +/- 4.2 years) with community acquired UTI, who presented in the emergency department of our medical school from 2000 - 2002, urine cultures were performed. Inclusion criteria were: acute voiding symptoms, significant bacteriuria with growth of at least 10 (5) colony-forming units/ml urine, leukocyturia > 50/ micro l. Exclusion criteria were underlying renal diseases, anatomic abnormalities of the urinary tract, age < 2 months and recurrent UTI.

Results: Patients presented with a mean rectal temperature of 38.6 +/- 1.3 degrees C, mean CRP of 66 +/- 68 mg/dl, mean WBC 13 500 +/- 5 600/ micro l and mean urinary leukocytes of 425 +/- 363/ micro l. In urine cultures E. coli was found in 47 % of the cases, Enterococcus faecalis 23 %, Proteus mirabilis 8 %, Klebsiella oxytoca 4 %, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 5 % and others 13 %. In 76 % one and in 24 % two different bacterial species (60 % Enterococcus faecalis) were cultured. Mean resistance rates were in all bacteria (in E. coli): Ampicillin 53 % (69 %), Ampicillin and Sulbactam 51 % (61 %), Cefalosporin 1 (st) generation (Cefaclor) 48 % (24 %), Cefalosporin 2 (nd) generation (Cefuroxim) 40 % (3 %), Cefalosporin 3 (rd) generation (Cefuroxim) 33 % (0 %), Tobramycin 30 % (2 %), Ciprofloxacine 0 %, Cotrimoxazole 40 % (42 %), Nitrofurantoin 12 % (0 %).

Conclusion: The resistance rates to Ampicillin (+/- Sulbactam) did not increase as compared to previous analyses (1990 - 1995), however, resistance rates to Cotrimoxazole and 1 (st) generation Cefalosporines increased about 20 %. We conclude that the policies for treatment of UTI in children should be re-evaluated every 5 years according to local resistance rates.

MeSH terms

  • Anti-Infective Agents, Urinary / therapeutic use*
  • Bacterial Infections / drug therapy*
  • Bacterial Infections / epidemiology
  • Bacterial Infections / microbiology*
  • Bacteriuria / drug therapy
  • Bacteriuria / epidemiology
  • Bacteriuria / microbiology
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Community-Acquired Infections / drug therapy*
  • Community-Acquired Infections / epidemiology
  • Community-Acquired Infections / microbiology*
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Drug Resistance, Multiple
  • Enterococcus faecalis / drug effects
  • Escherichia coli / drug effects
  • Escherichia coli Infections / drug therapy
  • Escherichia coli Infections / epidemiology
  • Escherichia coli Infections / microbiology
  • Female
  • Germany
  • Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections / drug therapy
  • Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections / epidemiology
  • Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections / microbiology
  • Humans
  • Incidence
  • Infant
  • Klebsiella Infections / drug therapy
  • Klebsiella Infections / epidemiology
  • Klebsiella Infections / microbiology
  • Klebsiella oxytoca / drug effects
  • Male
  • Microbial Sensitivity Tests
  • Proteus Infections / drug therapy
  • Proteus Infections / epidemiology
  • Proteus Infections / microbiology
  • Proteus mirabilis / drug effects
  • Pseudomonas Infections / drug therapy
  • Pseudomonas Infections / epidemiology
  • Pseudomonas Infections / microbiology
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa / drug effects
  • Urinary Tract Infections / drug therapy*
  • Urinary Tract Infections / epidemiology
  • Urinary Tract Infections / microbiology*

Substances

  • Anti-Infective Agents, Urinary