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Multicenter Study
, 363 (9422), 1699-700

Viral Shedding Patterns of Coronavirus in Patients With Probable Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

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Multicenter Study

Viral Shedding Patterns of Coronavirus in Patients With Probable Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

Peter K C Cheng et al. Lancet.

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is thought to be caused by a novel coronavirus, SARS-associated coronavirus. We studied viral shedding of SARS coronavirus to improve diagnosis and infection control. Reverse-transcriptase PCR was done on 2134 specimens of different types. 355 (45%) specimens of nasopharyngeal aspirates and 150 (28%) of faeces were positive for SARS coronavirus RNA. Positive rates peaked at 6-11 days after onset of illness for nasopharyngeal aspirates (87 of 149 [58%], to 37 of 62 [60%]), and 9-14 days for faeces (15 of 22 [68%], to 26 of 37 [70%]). Overall, peak viral loads were reached at 12-14 days of illness when patients were probably in hospital care, which would explain why hospital workers were prone to infection. Low rate of viral shedding in the first few days of illness meant that early isolation measures would probably be effective.

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