Epidemiology of congenital heart disease in Louisiana: an association between race and sex and the prevalence of specific cardiac malformations

Teratology. 1992 Sep;46(3):271-6. doi: 10.1002/tera.1420460311.

Abstract

We hypothesized that susceptibility to the genetic and environmental factors that disrupt cardiac development is associated with race and sex. To evaluate this hypothesis, we asked whether the prevalence of specific cardiac malformations differs by race and sex. We attempted to include all infants born alive in the State of Louisiana from January 1, 1988, through December 31, 1989, and diagnosed by echocardiography, catheterization and/or autopsy within a year of birth as having one of ten specific cardiac malformations. The prevalence of atrioventricular canal defects (AVCD) per 1,000 live births was significantly higher for black females (.744) compared to black males (.198) and for white females (.414) compared to white males (.116). Complete transposition of the great arteries (TGA) was significantly higher for white males (.559) compared to white females (.122); in contrast, TGA was not significantly different for black males (.198) and black females (.169). Obstructive left heart syndrome (OLHS)--aortic stenosis and/or coarctation of the aorta--was significantly higher for white males (.652) compared to white females (.317); in contrast, OLHS was not significantly different for black males (.264) and black females (.169). Single ventricle (SV) was significantly higher for whites (.202) compared to blacks (.067). We did not find that race and sex were associated with differences in the prevalence of tetralogy of Fallot and hypoplastic left heart syndrome. The numbers of infants with anomalous pulmonary venous return, tricuspid atresia, double outlet right ventricle, or truncus arteriosus were too small to measure an association with race and sex. These results demonstrate that the prevalence of a subset of cardiac malformations differs by race and sex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Female
  • Heart Defects, Congenital / epidemiology*
  • Humans
  • Louisiana
  • Male
  • Prevalence
  • Racial Groups
  • Risk Factors
  • Sex Factors