SPOC: a widely distributed domain associated with cancer, apoptosis and transcription

BMC Bioinformatics. 2004 Jul 7;5:91. doi: 10.1186/1471-2105-5-91.

Abstract

Background: The Split ends (Spen) family are large proteins characterised by N-terminal RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a conserved SPOC (Spen paralog and ortholog C-terminal) domain. The aim of this study is to characterize the family at the sequence level.

Results: We describe undetected members of the Spen family in other lineages (Plasmodium and Plants) and localise SPOC in a new domain context, in a family that is common to all eukaryotes using profile-based sequence searches and structural prediction methods.

Conclusions: The widely distributed DIO (Death inducer-obliterator) family is related to cancer and apoptosis and offers new clues about SPOC domain functionality.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Amino Acid Sequence / genetics
  • Animals
  • Apoptosis / genetics*
  • Arabidopsis Proteins / chemistry
  • Arabidopsis Proteins / genetics
  • Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins / chemistry
  • Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins / genetics
  • Conserved Sequence / genetics
  • Drosophila Proteins / chemistry
  • Drosophila Proteins / genetics
  • Humans
  • Molecular Sequence Data
  • Neoplasms / genetics*
  • Peptides / chemistry
  • Peptides / genetics*
  • Plasmodium / genetics
  • Protein Structure, Tertiary / genetics
  • Proteins / chemistry
  • Proteins / genetics
  • Protozoan Proteins / chemistry
  • Protozoan Proteins / genetics
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins / chemistry
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins / genetics
  • Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
  • Signal Recognition Particle / genetics*
  • Transcription, Genetic / genetics*
  • Xenopus Proteins / chemistry
  • Xenopus Proteins / genetics

Substances

  • Arabidopsis Proteins
  • Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins
  • Drosophila Proteins
  • Peptides
  • Proteins
  • Protozoan Proteins
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins
  • Signal Recognition Particle
  • Xenopus Proteins