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, 44 (11), 1640-7

Patterns of Age- And Sex-Specific Prevalence of Major Blood-Borne Infections in United States Blood Donors, 1995 to 2002: American Red Cross Blood Donor Study

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Patterns of Age- And Sex-Specific Prevalence of Major Blood-Borne Infections in United States Blood Donors, 1995 to 2002: American Red Cross Blood Donor Study

Shimian Zou et al. Transfusion.

Abstract

Background: The American Red Cross has been maintaining a research database of all blood donations, including all testing results for infectious disease markers, since 1995. This study analyzes the temporal trends of major blood-borne infections among blood donors.

Study design and methods: Temporal trends for age- and sex-specific prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and syphilis infections in US blood donors were analyzed based on linear trend or time series model or other models as appropriate.

Results: From 1995 to 2002, significant declines have been observed for infections that used to be at relatively higher levels. Declines in prevalence were slower among first-time donations than repeat donations. There was an increase in prevalence of anti-HCV among first-time male donors of 50 to 59 years of age. Anti-HIV prevalence appeared to have increased among first-time male donors of 30 to 39 years of age since 2000.

Conclusion: Different sex and age groups showed various patterns of decline and even signs of increase. The increasing prevalence among some age and sex groups may merit further investigation.

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