The efficacy and limitations of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy

Arch Surg. 1992 Mar;127(3):261-4. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.1992.01420030023003.

Abstract

We analyzed 64 percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy procedures performed by us between 1986 and 1990. Thirty patients had neurologic disease; 16 had head and neck cancers; eight had other malignancies; two had acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; and eight had other problems. Seven patients died within 30 days of complications (n = 4) or the primary illness (n = 3). Mean follow-up was 6 months; an additional patient died of aspiration and eight others died of their underlying illness. There were 19 complications (32%). Four wound complications occurred. Nine patients developed aspiration pneumonia within 3 days of the procedure, four of whom died in the hospital. Of the 24 patients with a history of aspiration, nine experienced aspiration during or after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. Patients with a history of aspiration were more likely to have perioperative aspiration pneumonia, and patients who experienced aspiration were more likely to die.

Publication types

  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Cause of Death
  • Clinical Protocols
  • Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal / adverse effects
  • Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal / standards*
  • Equipment Failure / statistics & numerical data
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Gastrostomy / adverse effects
  • Gastrostomy / mortality
  • Gastrostomy / standards*
  • Hospitals, University
  • Hospitals, Veterans
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Pneumonia, Aspiration / epidemiology
  • Pneumonia, Aspiration / etiology
  • Pneumonia, Aspiration / prevention & control
  • Postoperative Complications / epidemiology
  • Postoperative Complications / etiology
  • Postoperative Complications / prevention & control
  • San Francisco / epidemiology
  • Surgical Wound Infection / epidemiology
  • Surgical Wound Infection / etiology
  • Survival Rate