ACOG practice bulletin: Clinical management guidelines for obstetrician-gynecologists, number 57, November 2004. Gynecologic herpes simplex virus infections

Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Nov;104(5 Pt 1):1111-8.

Abstract

Both herpes simplex virus (HSV) type I and HSV type 2 can cause genital herpes. Because the infection is chronic, genital herpes has become the most common sexually transmitted disease among women. The prevalence of the HSV-2 antibody among women in the United States is 26%, although genital herpes has been diagnosed in only a small proportion (10-25%) of individuals with HSV-2 antibodies. Herpes simplex virus type I is becoming a more frequent cause of genital herpes, especially among young women. Overall,HSV-I seroprevalence in the United States is estimated at 67%, although sero-logic data do not provide information about site of infection. Recent advances in diagnostic methods and therapeutic options are likely to change the management of genital herpes.

Publication types

  • Guideline
  • Practice Guideline

MeSH terms

  • 2-Aminopurine / administration & dosage
  • 2-Aminopurine / analogs & derivatives*
  • 2-Aminopurine / therapeutic use
  • Acyclovir / administration & dosage
  • Acyclovir / analogs & derivatives*
  • Acyclovir / therapeutic use
  • Adult
  • Antiviral Agents / administration & dosage
  • Antiviral Agents / therapeutic use*
  • Famciclovir
  • Female
  • Herpes Genitalis / diagnosis*
  • Herpes Genitalis / drug therapy*
  • Herpes Genitalis / virology
  • Herpesvirus 1, Human* / physiology
  • Herpesvirus 2, Human / physiology
  • Humans
  • Valacyclovir
  • Valine / administration & dosage
  • Valine / analogs & derivatives*
  • Valine / therapeutic use
  • Virus Activation

Substances

  • Antiviral Agents
  • 2-Aminopurine
  • Valine
  • Valacyclovir
  • Famciclovir
  • Acyclovir