Learning and strain among newcomers: a three-wave study on the effects of job demands and job control

J Psychol. 2004 Nov;138(6):543-63. doi: 10.3200/JRLP.138.6.543-563.

Abstract

The present 3-wave longitudinal study was an examination of job-related learning and strain as a function of job demand and job control. The participants were 311 newcomers to their jobs. On the basis of R. A. Karasek and T. Theorell's (1990) demand-control model, the authors predicted that high demand and high job control would lead to high levels of learning; low demand and low job control should lead to low levels of learning; high demand and low job control should lead to high levels of strain; and low demand and high job control should lead to low levels of strain. The relation between strain and learning was also examined. The authors tested the hypotheses using ANCOVA and structural equation modeling. The results revealed that high levels of strain have an adverse effect on learning; the reverse effect was not confirmed. It appears that Karasek and Theorell's model is very relevant when examining work socialization processes.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Employment / psychology*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Internal-External Control
  • Learning*
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Male
  • Models, Psychological
  • Multivariate Analysis
  • Netherlands
  • Socialization*
  • Stress, Psychological / psychology*
  • Workload