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Clinical Trial
. 2005 Feb;40(2):157-64.
doi: 10.1097/00005176-200502000-00014.

Prebiotic Effect of Fructo-Oligosaccharide Supplemented Term Infant Formula at Two Concentrations Compared With Unsupplemented Formula and Human Milk

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Clinical Trial

Prebiotic Effect of Fructo-Oligosaccharide Supplemented Term Infant Formula at Two Concentrations Compared With Unsupplemented Formula and Human Milk

Arthur R Euler et al. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. .

Abstract

Background: Human milk components, including oligosaccharides, affect the gastrointestinal flora of infants. Previous studies in adults have demonstrated that fructo-oligosaccharides increase potentially beneficial fecal bacteria, including bifidobacteria. The purpose of this study was to determine the prebiotic effect of infant formula supplemented with fructo-oligosaccharides.

Methods: Healthy term infants 2 to 6 weeks of age were enrolled in a 5-week, prospective, randomized, crossover, single-site study with a nonrandomized human milk comparator group. Washout weeks preceded and followed a week of feeding with fructo-oligosaccharide-supplemented formula (1.5 or 3.0 g/L). Stool specimens were quantitatively cultured weekly for bacteroides, lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, clostridia and enterococci and were tested for Clostridium difficile toxin.

Results: Seventy-two of 87 infants completed the trial; 58 were formula fed and 14 were human milk fed. Mean counts of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli were similar in all groups at entry and no group experienced a significant change in counts with fructo-oligosaccharide supplementation. After 7 days of fructo-oligosaccharide supplementation the bifidobacteria counts were greater in the 1.5 g/L fructo-oligosaccharide formula group than in the human milk fed or 3.0 g/L fructo-oligosaccharide formula groups. Formula-fed infants had higher counts of enterococci and bacteroides before fructo-oligosaccharide supplementation, and these counts did not change after supplementation. Clostridium counts increased 7 days after supplementation in the 1.5 g/L fructo-oligosaccharide formula group (P = 0.0356). No human milk fed infants had C. difficile toxin in stools. Fructo-oligosaccharide (3.0 g/L) supplementation resulted in more frequent and significantly softer stools.

Conclusions: Infant formula supplemented with 1.5 or 3.0 g/L fructo-oligosaccharides was safe but had minimal effect on fecal flora and C. difficile toxin.

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