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. 2005 Mar;9(1):52-7.
doi: 10.1007/s00784-005-0306-7. Epub 2005 Feb 23.

Fluoride Uptake and Resistance to Further Demineralisation of Demineralised Enamel After Application of Differently Concentrated Acidulated Sodium Fluoride Gels

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Fluoride Uptake and Resistance to Further Demineralisation of Demineralised Enamel After Application of Differently Concentrated Acidulated Sodium Fluoride Gels

Annette Wiegand et al. Clin Oral Investig. .

Abstract

The objective of this study was to analyse fluoride uptake and microhardness alteration of carious-like demineralised enamel after application of differently concentrated acidulated sodium fluoride gels and to determine the effect of fluoridation on enamel resistance against subsequent demineralisation. Artificial caries-like lesions of bovine enamel specimens were treated with sodium fluoride gels of different concentration (group A: 1.25%, group B: 0.62%, group C: 0.31%, group D: 0.15%; n=20 each group) for 5 min and stored in artificial saliva for 24 h. This cycle was carried out three times. Subsequently, KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride (determined at depths of 30, 60, and 90 microm) were analysed. In the second part of the study, for each 12 enamel specimens surface microhardness was determined before and after demineralisation, after fluoridation with the differently concentrated gels A-D, and after a second demineralisation. With all groups uptake of KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride resulted in higher levels than baseline content. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between fluoride uptake among the groups, with highest uptake for the 1.25% gel and lowest for the 0.15% gel. Moreover, with all gels highest uptake was observed in the outermost enamel layer (P<0.05). Microhardness values after second demineralisation increased with increased concentration of the applied sodium fluoride gel. Increasing concentration of the applied gel implies better protection of the enamel specimens against subsequent demineralisation (P<0.05). It is concluded that differently concentrated acidulated sodium fluoride gels resulted in concentration-related significant uptake of fluoride in carious-like demineralised enamel, leading to a better demineralisation protection with increasing fluoride concentration in the gel.

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