Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty: a comprehensive review

Neurosurg Focus. 2005 Mar 15;18(3):e1. doi: 10.3171/foc.2005.18.3.2.

Abstract

Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty are relatively new techniques used to treat painful vertebral compression fractures (VCFs). Vertebroplasty is the injection of bone cement, generally polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), into a vertebral body (VB). Kyphoplasty is the placement of balloons (called "tamps") into the VB, followed by an inflation/deflation sequence to create a cavity prior to the cement injection. These procedures are most often performed in a percutaneous fashion on an outpatient (or short stay) basis. The mechanism of action is unknown, but it is postulated that stabilization of the fracture leads to analgesia. The procedures are indicated for painful VCFs due to osteoporosis or malignancy, and for painful hemangiomas. These procedures may be efficacious in treating painful vertebral metastasis and traumatic VCFs. Much evidence favors the use of these procedures for pain associated with the aforementioned disorders. The risks associated with the procedures are low but serious complications can occur. These risks include spinal cord compression, nerve root compression, venous embolism, and pulmonary embolism including cardiovascular collapse. The risk/benefit ratio appears to be favorable in carefully selected patients. The technical aspects of the procedures are presented in detail along with guidelines for patient selection. A comprehensive review of the evidence for the procedures and the reported complications is presented.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Humans
  • Kyphosis / diagnosis
  • Kyphosis / etiology
  • Kyphosis / surgery*
  • Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures / methods*
  • Orthopedic Procedures / methods*
  • Patient Selection
  • Spinal Fractures / surgery*
  • Treatment Outcome