Family poverty accounts for differences in lower-extremity amputation rates of minorities 50 years old or more with diabetes

J Natl Med Assoc. 2005 Mar;97(3):334-8.

Abstract

Rates of leg amputations in diabetics are known to differ among racial/ethnic groups, but the relationship between family poverty and the risk of amputation has not been fully addressed. One-hundred-seven diabetic patients, all 50 or more years old and all from ZIP code tabulation area 778, underwent their first amputations at one hospital. Linear regression evaluated differences in age and atherosclerosis severity among African-American, Hispanic-American and other patients. chi2 statistics evaluated differences among African-American, Hispanic-American and other patients, with respect to sex and type of amputation. chi2 statistics evaluated differences among fractions of African- American, Hispanic-American and other patients, with respect to those residents 50 years old and older and those of poor families. Patient groups did not differ in regard to age, atherosclerosis severity, sex or type of amputation (P>0.05). The percents who were African-American, Hispanic-American, and other (33%, 21%, and 47%, respectively) differed markedly from those of persons 50 or more years old [13%, 7%, and 79%, (w=0.81, P<0.00001)] and mirrored those of poor families [37%, 19%, and 44% (w=0.08, P>0.05)]. Family poverty accounts for differences in diabetic amputation rates of African Americans, Hispanic Americans and other persons 50 or more years old.

MeSH terms

  • Age Factors
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Amputation / statistics & numerical data*
  • Arteriosclerosis / surgery
  • Continental Population Groups*
  • Diabetes Complications*
  • Diabetic Angiopathies / surgery
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Poverty*
  • United States / epidemiology