Alcohol use in college students: effects of level of self-esteem, narcissism, and contingencies of self-worth

Psychol Addict Behav. 2005 Mar;19(1):99-103. doi: 10.1037/0893-164X.19.1.99.

Abstract

The unique effects of level of self-esteem, narcissism, and contingencies of self-worth assessed prior to college on alcohol use during the freshman year were examined in a longitudinal study of 620 college students. Narcissism predicted alcohol use, but level of self-esteem did not. Basing self-worth on appearance predicted more alcohol use, whereas the virtue, God's love, and academic competence contingencies predicted less alcohol use, independent of other personality measures and joining a sorority or a fraternity. Further, the virtue and academic competence contingencies were associated with decreases in alcohol use from the 1st to the 2nd semester.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Alcohol Drinking* / epidemiology
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Internal-External Control*
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Male
  • Narcissism*
  • Personality Inventory
  • Psychometrics
  • Self Concept*
  • Social Values
  • Students*
  • United States
  • Universities