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, 24 (4), 196-202

The Use of the 12-item Short-Form Health Status Instrument in a Longitudinal Study of Patients With Stroke and Transient Ischaemic Attack

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The Use of the 12-item Short-Form Health Status Instrument in a Longitudinal Study of Patients With Stroke and Transient Ischaemic Attack

Jacqueline Müller-Nordhorn et al. Neuroepidemiology.

Abstract

The 36-item short-form health survey (SF-36) is one of the most commonly used health status instruments in patients with cerebrovascular disease. However, responsiveness to change in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has not yet been assessed for the SF-36 and its shortened version, the SF-12. The main objective of the present study was to determine responsiveness to change of the SF-12 in patients with cerebrovascular disease. Patients with stroke/transient ischaemic attack (TIA) were included at admission to one of four participating hospitals. HRQoL was assessed with the Physical (PCS-12) and Mental (MCS-12) Component Summary scales at baseline (referring to the status prior to the event) and after 12 months. Responsiveness to change was determined with the standardized response mean (SRM) and classified as small (SRM 0.20-0.49), moderate (0.50-0.79) or large (> or =0.80). A total of 558 patients were included [55% men, mean age 65 (SD, 13) years; 45% women, mean age 69 (SD, 14) years]. Indications for admission were stroke (74%) and TIA (26%). In patients with stroke, SRMs were small for the PCS-12 [SRM 0.49; absolute change -5.9 (SD, 12)] and moderate for the MCS-12 [SRM 0.52; absolute change -6.6 (SD, 13)]. In patients with TIA, SRMs were below 0.2 for the PCS-12 [absolute change -0.7 (SD, 11)] and small for the MCS-12 [SRM 0.34; absolute change -3.7 (SD, 11)]. SRMs increased with stroke severity as indicated by the NIHSS score. The SF-12 summary scales showed a small to moderate responsiveness to change in patients after stroke. Responsiveness to change was higher in patients with increased symptom severity.

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