A comparison of in-class learner engagement across lecture, problem-based learning, and team learning using the STROBE classroom observation tool

Teach Learn Med. Spring 2005;17(2):112-8. doi: 10.1207/s15328015tlm1702_4.

Abstract

Background: Having recently introduced team learning into the preclinical medical curriculum, evidence of the relative impact of this instructional method on in-class learner engagement was sought.

Purpose: To compare patterns of engagement behaviors among learners in class sessions across 3 distinct instructional methods: lecture, problem-based learning (PBL), and team learning.

Methods: Trained observers used the STROBE classroom observation tool to measure learner engagement in 7 lecture, 4 PBL, and 3 team learning classrooms over a 12-month period. Proportions of different types of engagement behaviors were compared using chi-square.

Results: In PBL and team learning, the amount of learner-to-learner engagement was similar and much greater than in lecture, where most engagement was of the learner-to-instructor and self-engagement types. Also, learner-to-instructor engagement appeared greater in team learning than in PBL.

Conclusions: Observed engagement behaviors confirm the potential of team learning to foster engagement similar to PBL, but with greater faculty input.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Behavior
  • Education, Medical, Undergraduate / organization & administration*
  • Group Processes*
  • Humans
  • Observation*
  • Problem-Based Learning
  • Students
  • Teaching
  • United States