Impact of the Cancer Risk Intake System on patient-clinician discussions of tamoxifen, genetic counseling, and colonoscopy

J Gen Intern Med. 2005 Apr;20(4):360-5. doi: 10.1111/j.1525-1497.2005.40115.x.

Abstract

The Cancer Risk Intake System (CRIS), a computerized program that "matches" objective cancer risks to appropriate risk management recommendations, was designed to facilitate patient-clinician discussion. We evaluated CRIS in primary care settings via a single-group, self-report, pretest-posttest design. Participants completed baseline telephone surveys, used CRIS during clinic visits, and completed follow-up surveys 1 to 2 months postvisit. Compared with proportions reporting having had discussions at baseline, significantly greater proportions of participants reported having discussed tamoxifen, genetic counseling, and colonoscopy, as appropriate, after using CRIS. Most (79%) reported CRIS had "caused" their discussion. CRIS is an easily used, disseminable program that showed promising results in primary care settings.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Algorithms
  • Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal / therapeutic use
  • Breast Neoplasms / epidemiology*
  • Breast Neoplasms / prevention & control
  • Colonic Neoplasms / epidemiology*
  • Colonic Neoplasms / prevention & control
  • Colonoscopy
  • Communication*
  • Counseling
  • Female
  • Genetic Counseling
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Odds Ratio
  • Ovarian Neoplasms / epidemiology*
  • Ovarian Neoplasms / prevention & control
  • Patient Acceptance of Health Care
  • Patient Education as Topic / methods
  • Physician-Patient Relations*
  • Primary Health Care
  • Risk Assessment / methods*
  • Tamoxifen / therapeutic use

Substances

  • Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal
  • Tamoxifen