Oxidative stress during treatment with first- and second-generation antipsychotics

J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci. Spring 2005;17(2):227-31. doi: 10.1176/jnp.17.2.227.

Abstract

Neurotoxicity of first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs) may be involved in lipid peroxidation, which is the pathogenesis of extrapyramidal symptoms, including tardive dyskinesia (TD). Blood samples at day 0, 7, and 21 drawn from patients taking antipsychotics were analyzed for malondialdehyde (MDA) in plasma, a marker of lipid peroxidation, by high-performance liquid chromatography. Of 115 patients enrolled, 92 patients completed the study. Most MDA levels were within normal ranges (<1.0 micromol/liter). Malondialdehyde levels in patients receiving clozapine (p = 0.002), quetiapine (p = 0.003), amisulpride (p = 0.008), and risperidone (p = 0.008) were significantly lower than within the first generation antipsychotic group. The authors conclude that lipid peroxidation is significantly higher in treatment with FGAs.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Antipsychotic Agents / adverse effects*
  • Antipsychotic Agents / therapeutic use
  • Basal Ganglia Diseases / metabolism
  • Basal Ganglia Diseases / physiopathology
  • Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Lipid Peroxidation / drug effects
  • Male
  • Malondialdehyde / blood
  • Middle Aged
  • Oxidative Stress / drug effects*
  • Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
  • Schizophrenia / drug therapy
  • Schizophrenia / metabolism

Substances

  • Antipsychotic Agents
  • Malondialdehyde