Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Randomized Controlled Trial
. 2005 Oct;181(4):790-8.
doi: 10.1007/s00213-005-0082-8. Epub 2005 Sep 29.

Next-day Residual Effects of Hypnotics in DSM-IV Primary Insomnia: A Driving Simulator Study With Simultaneous Electroencephalogram Monitoring

Affiliations
Randomized Controlled Trial

Next-day Residual Effects of Hypnotics in DSM-IV Primary Insomnia: A Driving Simulator Study With Simultaneous Electroencephalogram Monitoring

Luc Staner et al. Psychopharmacology (Berl). .

Abstract

Rationale: Most studies that investigated the next-day residual effects of hypnotic drugs on daytime driving performances were performed on healthy subjects and after a single drug administration.

Objectives: In the present study, we further examine whether the results of these studies could be generalised to insomniac patients and after repeated drug administration.

Method: Single and repeated (7 day) doses of zolpidem (10 mg), zopiclone (7.5 mg), lormetazepam (1 mg) or placebo were administered at bedtime in a crossover design to 23 patients (9 men and 14 women aged 38.8+/-2.0 years) with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) primary insomnia. Driving tests were performed 9-11 h post-dose.

Results: Results showed that treatment effects were evidenced for subjective sleep, for driving abilities, and for electroencephalogram (EEG) recorded before (resting EEG) and during the driving simulation test (driving EEG). Compared to placebo, zopiclone increased the number of collisions and lormetazepam increased deviation from speed limit and deviation from absolute speed, whereas zolpidem did not differentiate from placebo on these analyses. EEG recordings showed that in contrast to zolpidem, lormetazepam and zopiclone induced typical benzodiazepine-like alterations, suggesting that next-day poor driving performance could relate to a prolonged central nervous system effect of these two hypnotics.

Conclusion: The present results corroborate studies on healthy volunteers showing that residual effects of hypnotics increase with their half-lives. The results further suggest that drugs preserving physiological EEG rhythms before and during the driving simulation test 9-11 h post-dose, such as zolpidem, do not influence next-day driving abilities.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 17 articles

See all "Cited by" articles

References

    1. Mil Med. 1983 Sep;148(9):727-31 - PubMed
    1. JAMA. 1997 Jul 2;278(1):27-31 - PubMed
    1. JAMA. 1997 Dec 24-31;278(24):2170-7 - PubMed
    1. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2002 Jul;40(7):304-9 - PubMed
    1. Sleep. 2004 Aug 1;27(5):899-904 - PubMed

Publication types

MeSH terms

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback