Brief communication: The prevalence of high intake of vitamin E from the use of supplements among U.S. adults

Ann Intern Med. 2005 Jul 19;143(2):116-20. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-143-2-200507190-00010.

Abstract

Background: People who consume at least 400 IU of vitamin E per day from supplements may be at slightly increased risk for premature mortality.

Objective: To estimate the percentage of U.S. adults age 20 years or older who consume at least 400 IU of vitamin E per day through the use of vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements.

Design: Cross-sectional analysis.

Setting: The 1999-2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Patients: Representative sample of the civilian, noninstitutionalized U.S. population.

Measurements: Participants answered questions about the use of vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements.

Results: Among 4609 adults, 11.3% (95% CI, 9.7% to 13.1%) consumed at least 400 IU of vitamin E per day from supplements. Such intake increased with age, was about equal for men and women, and was more common among white persons (14.1%; CI, 11.9% to 16.7%) than African-American (3.7% [CI, 2.6% to 5.2%]) or Mexican-American persons (3.9% [CI, 2.8% to 5.4%]). The median dietary intake of vitamin E was 8.8 IU per day.

Limitations: Information about vitamin E intake was self-reported.

Conclusions: The use of vitamin E supplements in dosages of at least 400 IU per day is common among U.S. adults.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Dietary Supplements / statistics & numerical data*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Nutrition Surveys
  • United States
  • Vitamin E / administration & dosage*
  • alpha-Tocopherol / blood
  • gamma-Tocopherol / blood

Substances

  • Vitamin E
  • gamma-Tocopherol
  • alpha-Tocopherol