The smoking-thrombolysis paradox and acute ischemic stroke

Neurology. 2005 Jul 26;65(2):293-5. doi: 10.1212/01.wnl.0000168163.72351.f3.

Abstract

Smokers with acute myocardial infarction have better outcomes after thrombolysis than nonsmokers. The authors evaluated the independent effect of smoking on short-term outcome following IV thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke. After adjusting for covariates, recent smokers who received thrombolysis had a significantly greater drop in 24-hour median stroke severity scores from baseline than nonsmokers who received thrombolysis and lower mortality over 1 year.

Publication types

  • Clinical Trial
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Age Factors
  • Aged
  • Blood Coagulation / drug effects
  • Blood Coagulation / physiology
  • Blood Glucose / physiology
  • Brain Ischemia / drug therapy
  • Brain Ischemia / mortality*
  • Brain Ischemia / physiopathology
  • Causality
  • Cerebrovascular Disorders / drug therapy
  • Cerebrovascular Disorders / mortality*
  • Cerebrovascular Disorders / physiopathology
  • Comorbidity
  • Drug Interactions / physiology
  • Female
  • Fibrinolytic Agents / pharmacology*
  • Fibrinolytic Agents / therapeutic use
  • Humans
  • Injections, Intravenous
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Recovery of Function / drug effects
  • Recovery of Function / physiology
  • Sex Factors
  • Smoking / epidemiology*
  • Stroke / drug therapy
  • Stroke / mortality*
  • Stroke / physiopathology
  • Survival Rate
  • Tobacco / metabolism
  • Treatment Outcome

Substances

  • Blood Glucose
  • Fibrinolytic Agents