Ethnic differences in past hysterectomy for benign conditions

Womens Health Issues. Jul-Aug 2005;15(4):179-86. doi: 10.1016/j.whi.2005.05.002.

Abstract

Background: Hysterectomy for a benign condition is common, particularly in the underserved. The objective was to determine if ethnic differences could be explained by known risk factors.

Methods: A phone survey was conducted at random on 15,160 women, ages 40-55, from seven US cities. Subjects were 49.9% Caucasian, 28.1% African American, 12.3% Hispanic, and 9.8% Asian American.

Results: Ethnicity was associated with past hysterectomy (odds ratio [OR]: Caucasian = 1.0, African American = 1.66; confidence interval [CI] = 1.46-1.88, Hispanic = 1.64, CI = 1.29-2.07; Asian American = 0.44, CI = 0.34-0.56), after adjustment for age, education, fibroids, body mass index, marital status, smoking, geographic site, and country of education.

Conclusion: Because the highest rates occurred in the disadvantaged African American and Hispanic subgroups, and could not be explained by known risk factors, disparity in the form of overuse in these disadvantaged groups may exist.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Multicenter Study
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • African Americans / statistics & numerical data
  • Asian Americans / statistics & numerical data
  • Demography
  • European Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data
  • Female
  • Health Services Misuse / statistics & numerical data*
  • Hispanic Americans / statistics & numerical data
  • Humans
  • Hysterectomy / psychology
  • Hysterectomy / statistics & numerical data*
  • Interviews as Topic
  • Menopause / ethnology*
  • Middle Aged
  • Minority Groups / statistics & numerical data*
  • Odds Ratio
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • United States
  • Uterine Diseases / ethnology*
  • Uterine Diseases / surgery*
  • Vulnerable Populations / ethnology*
  • Women's Health / ethnology