Angiogenesis, vasculogenesis, and induction of healing in chronic wounds

Vasc Endovascular Surg. Jul-Aug 2005;39(4):293-306. doi: 10.1177/153857440503900401.

Abstract

A key central stage of wound healing requires neovascularization of the wound base granulation tissue. In the adult, neovascularization is now known to occur by both angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. Understanding the biology of these 2 processes offers promising new therapeutic options for patients who suffer from chronic, nonhealing ischemic wounds. The authors review the current literature on the processes of angiogenesis and vasculogenesis and how it relates to wound healing.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Angiogenesis Inducing Agents / pharmacology
  • Angiogenesis Inducing Agents / therapeutic use
  • Animals
  • Bone Marrow Cells / cytology
  • Bone Marrow Cells / drug effects
  • Cell Differentiation
  • Cell Proliferation
  • Endothelial Cells / cytology
  • Endothelial Cells / drug effects
  • Humans
  • Ischemia / drug therapy
  • Ischemia / physiopathology*
  • Ischemia / therapy
  • Multipotent Stem Cells / cytology
  • Multipotent Stem Cells / drug effects
  • Neovascularization, Physiologic*
  • Platelet-Derived Growth Factor / genetics
  • Platelet-Derived Growth Factor / pharmacology
  • Platelet-Derived Growth Factor / therapeutic use
  • Recombinant Proteins / pharmacology
  • Recombinant Proteins / therapeutic use
  • Stem Cell Transplantation / methods
  • Varicose Ulcer / drug therapy
  • Varicose Ulcer / physiopathology*
  • Varicose Ulcer / therapy
  • Wound Healing / drug effects
  • Wound Healing / physiology*

Substances

  • Angiogenesis Inducing Agents
  • Platelet-Derived Growth Factor
  • Recombinant Proteins