Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
, 113 (10), 1295-8

Declining Sex Ratio in a First Nation Community

Affiliations

Declining Sex Ratio in a First Nation Community

Constanze A Mackenzie et al. Environ Health Perspect.

Abstract

Members of the Aamjiwnaang First Nation community near Sarnia, Ontario, Canada, voiced concerns that there appeared to be fewer male children in their community in recent years. In response to these concerns, we assessed the sex ratio (proportion of male births) of the Aamjiwnaang First Nation over the period 1984-2003 as part of a community-based participatory research project. The trend in the proportion of male live births of the Aamjiwnaang First Nation has been declining continuously from the early 1990s to 2003, from an apparently stable sex ratio prior to this time. The proportion of male births (m) showed a statistically significant decline over the most recent 10-year period (1994-2003) (m = 0.412, p = 0.008) with the most pronounced decrease observed during the most recent 5 years (1999-2003) (m = 0.348, p = 0.006). Numerous factors have been associated with a decrease in the proportion of male births in a population, including a number of environmental and occupational chemical exposures. This community is located within the Great Lakes St. Clair River Area of Concern and is situated immediately adjacent to several large petrochemical, polymer, and chemical industrial plants. Although there are several potential factors that could be contributing to the observed decrease in sex ratio of the Aamjiwnaang First Nation, the close proximity of this community to a large aggregation of industries and potential exposures to compounds that may influence sex ratios warrants further assessment into the types of chemical exposures for this population. A community health survey is currently under way to gather more information about the health of the Aamjiwnaang community and to provide additional information about the factors that could be contributing to the observed decrease in the proportion of male births in recent years.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Proportion of live male births (male live births/total live births) for Aamjiwnaang First Nation 1984–2003. The dotted line is the expected male proportion for Canada (0.512). The dashed line is the linear regression line for the period 1984–1992; r2 = 0.000; slope not significantly different from zero (p = 0.990). The solid line is the linear regression line for the period 1993–2003; r2 = 0.547; statistically significant deviation of slope from zero (p = 0.009).

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 17 PubMed Central articles

See all "Cited by" articles

References

    1. Allahbadia GN. The 50 million missing women. J Assist Reprod Genet. 2002;19(9):411–416. - PMC - PubMed
    1. Allan BB, Brant R, Seidel JE, Jarrell JF. Declining sex ratios in Canada. Can Med Assoc J. 1997;156:37–41. - PMC - PubMed
    1. Ansari-Lari M, Saadat M. Changing sex ratio in Iran, 1976–2000. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2002;56:622–623. - PMC - PubMed
    1. Bartleby.com 2003. Sex ratio. In: The World Factbook. Washington, DC:Central Intelligence Agency. Available: http://www.bartleby.com/151/fields/27.html [accessed 31 March 2005].
    1. Davis DL, Gottlieb MB, Stampnitzky JR. Reduced ratio of male to female births in several industrial countries: a sentinel health indicator? JAMA. 1998;279:1018–1023. - PubMed

Publication types

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback