Influence of the factor V Leiden mutation on infectious disease susceptibility and outcome: a population-based study

J Infect Dis. 2005 Nov 15;192(10):1851-7. doi: 10.1086/497167. Epub 2005 Oct 12.

Abstract

Background: The effect of the coagulation factor V Leiden mutation on infectious disease susceptibility and outcome is controversial.

Methods: We genotyped 9253 individuals from the Copenhagen City Heart Study for the factor V Leiden mutation. The risk of hospitalization for any infectious disease during a follow-up period of 7.2 years and subsequent risk of disease progression to death were estimated by Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis.

Results: During 66,789 person-years of follow-up, 1093 persons were hospitalized because of infection. The risk of urinary-tract infection was decreased in factor V Leiden heterozygotes, compared with that in noncarriers (adjusted relative risk [aRR], 0.55 [95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31-0.99]), whereas the risk of skin infection was increased (aRR, 1.68 [95% CI, 1.07-2.66]). No associations between carrier status and risk of diarrheal disease, other viral infections, parasitic infections, pneumonia, sepsis, or upper respiratory-tract infection were detected. However, in subjects hospitalized for sepsis, factor V Leiden carriers were at an increased risk of mortality 28 days after admission, compared with noncarriers (aRR, 4.41; 95% CI, 1.42-13.67]).

Conclusion: In the Danish general population, the factor V Leiden mutation may be associated with infectious disease susceptibility and an increased risk of mortality from sepsis.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Communicable Diseases / genetics*
  • Communicable Diseases / mortality*
  • Denmark
  • Disease Susceptibility
  • Factor V / genetics*
  • Female
  • Genetic Predisposition to Disease
  • Hospitalization
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Mutation*
  • Proportional Hazards Models
  • Sepsis / genetics*
  • Sepsis / mortality*

Substances

  • factor V Leiden
  • Factor V