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, 290 (3), C862-72

Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Inhibits Endocytic Recycling of CFTR in Polarized Human Airway Epithelial Cells

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Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Inhibits Endocytic Recycling of CFTR in Polarized Human Airway Epithelial Cells

Agnieszka Swiatecka-Urban et al. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol.

Abstract

The most common mutation in the CFTR gene in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), DeltaF508, leads to the absence of CFTR Cl(-) channels in the apical plasma membrane, which in turn results in impairment of mucociliary clearance, the first line of defense against inhaled bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is particularly successful at colonizing and chronically infecting the lungs and is responsible for the majority of morbidity and mortality in patients with CF. Rescue of DeltaF508-CFTR by reduced temperature or chemical means reveals that the protein is at least partially functional as a Cl(-) channel. Thus current research efforts have focused on identification of drugs that restore the presence of CFTR in the apical membrane to alleviate the symptoms of CF. Because little is known about the effects of P. aeruginosa on CFTR in the apical membrane, whether P. aeruginosa will affect the efficacy of new drugs designed to restore the plasma membrane expression of CFTR is unknown. Accordingly, the objective of the present study was to determine whether P. aeruginosa affects CFTR-mediated Cl(-) secretion in polarized human airway epithelial cells. We report herein that a cell-free filtrate of P. aeruginosa reduced CFTR-mediated transepithelial Cl(-) secretion by inhibiting the endocytic recycling of CFTR and thus the number of WT-CFTR and DeltaF508-CFTR Cl(-) channels in the apical membrane in polarized human airway epithelial cells. These data suggest that chronic infection with P. aeruginosa may interfere with therapeutic strategies aimed at increasing the apical membrane expression of DeltaF508-CFTR.

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