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Review
, 2 (12), e392

Serotonin and Depression: A Disconnect Between the Advertisements and the Scientific Literature

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Review

Serotonin and Depression: A Disconnect Between the Advertisements and the Scientific Literature

Jeffrey R Lacasse et al. PLoS Med.

Abstract

Many ads for SSRI antidepressants claim that the drugs boost brain serotonin levels. Lacasse and Leo argue there is little scientific evidence to support this claim.

Conflict of interest statement

Competing Interests: The authors declare that no competing interests exist and that they received no funding for this work.

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(Illustration: Margaret Shear, Public Library of Science)

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References

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