Effects of anger on left ventricular ejection fraction in coronary artery disease

Am J Cardiol. 1992 Aug 1;70(3):281-5. doi: 10.1016/0002-9149(92)90605-x.

Abstract

This study examined the comparative potency of several psychological stressors and exercise in eliciting myocardial ischemia as measured by left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) changes using radionuclide ventriculography. Twenty-seven subjects underwent both exercise (bicycle) and psychological stressors (mental arithmetic, recall of an incident that elicited anger, giving a short speech defending oneself against a charge of shoplifting) during which EF, blood pressure, heart rate and ST segment were measured. Eighteen subjects had 1-vessel coronary artery disease (CAD), defined by greater than 50% diameter stenosis in 1 artery as assessed by arteriography. Nine subjects served as healthy control subjects. Anger recall reduced EF more than exercise and the other psychological stressors (overall F [3.51] = 2.87, p = .05). Respective changes in EF for the CAD patients were -5% during anger recall, +2% during exercise, 0% during mental arithmetic and 0% during the speech stressor. More patients with CAD had significant reduction in EF (greater than or equal to 7%) during anger (7 of 18) than during exercise (4 of 18). The difference in EF change between patients with CAD and healthy control subjects was significant for both anger (t25 = 2.23, p = 0.04) and exercise (t25 = 2.63, p = 0.01) stressors. In this group of patients with CAD, anger appeared to be a particularly potent psychological stressor.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Anger / physiology*
  • Anxiety / physiopathology
  • Blood Pressure
  • Coronary Disease / diagnostic imaging
  • Coronary Disease / physiopathology
  • Coronary Disease / psychology*
  • Electrocardiography
  • Exercise Test
  • Heart Rate
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Myocardial Contraction
  • Radionuclide Ventriculography
  • Stress, Psychological / physiopathology
  • Stroke Volume*