Acculturation and mammography screening among Hispanic women living in farmworker communities

Cancer Control. 2005 Nov;12 Suppl 2:21-7. doi: 10.1177/1073274805012004S04.

Abstract

The relationship between acculturation and mammography screening practices among Hispanic women is unclear due to inconsistent study findings. The purpose of this research was to further investigate the effect of acculturation on mammography screening practices among Hispanic women and to explore the effect of biculturalism on mammography screening. Hispanic female farmworkers (N = 716) who were 50 years of age and older living in communities in Texas, New Mexico, and California were interviewed at their homes. Data collection was conducted from November 2001 to February 2002. Logistic regression models showed no significant effect for acculturation for the entire sample. Post hoc stratified analysis found that bicultural study participants in California were 3 times more likely to be adherent to screening compared to those with low acculturation. Study findings suggest that distinct differences might exist for Hispanic women living in farmworker communities in California, and perhaps other communities not on the United States-Mexico border. Women in such communities with low levels of acculturation can be targeted for interventions to increase mammography adherence.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Acculturation*
  • Aged
  • Agriculture*
  • California
  • Cultural Characteristics
  • Female
  • Health Services Accessibility
  • Hispanic Americans*
  • Humans
  • Insurance Coverage
  • Insurance, Health
  • Mammography / statistics & numerical data*
  • Middle Aged
  • New Mexico
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • Texas