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, 164 (5), 852-9

An Epidemic of Hepatitis A Attributable to the Ingestion of Raw Clams in Shanghai, China

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An Epidemic of Hepatitis A Attributable to the Ingestion of Raw Clams in Shanghai, China

M L Halliday et al. J Infect Dis.

Abstract

An epidemic of hepatitis A in 1988 in Shanghai had an overall attack rate of 4083/100,000 population (292,301 cases). The epidemic curve showed three peaks in January and February. A case-control study of 1208 matched pairs supported that clams were the vehicle for the virus (summary odds ratio, 9.47; P less than .001). Analysis of subsets who had eaten clams indicated that only 3.5% with hepatitis A had cooked their clams compared with 18.1% without hepatitis A, and those with the disease consumed more clams. A historical cohort study indicated that approximately 31.7% of the population had eaten clams one or more times between 9 December 1987 and 3 January 1988. The estimated attack rates in those who had and had not eaten clams were 11.93% and 0.52%, respectively (relative risk, 22.94; attributable risk, 11.41%). The three peaks in the consumption curve correlated with those in the epidemic curve. Hepatitis A virus was demonstrated in clams taken from the Shanghai markets and from the catching area.

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