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, 83 (2), 272-7

Chilling-Enhanced Photooxidation : The Peroxidative Destruction of Lipids During Chilling Injury to Photosynthesis and Ultrastructure

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Chilling-Enhanced Photooxidation : The Peroxidative Destruction of Lipids During Chilling Injury to Photosynthesis and Ultrastructure

R R Wise et al. Plant Physiol.

Abstract

Chilling-induced photooxidation was studied in detached leaves of chilling-sensitive (CS) cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) and chilling resistant (CR) pea (Pisum sativum L.). The rates of photosynthesis and respiration, measured as O(2) exchange, were found to be comparable in the two species over a temperature range of 5 to 35 degrees C. Chilling at 5 degrees C for 12 hours in high light (1000 microeinsteins per square meter per second) decreased CO(2) uptake 75% in detached pea leaves whereas CO(2) uptake by cucumber was reduced to zero within 2 hours. Respiration was unaffected in either species by the chilling and light treatment. Although ultrastructural alterations were apparent in chloroplasts of both species, cucumber's were affected sooner and more severely. The mechanism of photooxidative lipid peroxidation was investigated by following the production of ethane gas under a variety of conditions. Maximum ethane production occurred in the CS cucumber at low temperature (5 degrees C) and high light (1000 microeinsteins per square meter per second). Atrazine, an inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport, almost completely halted this chilling- and light-induced ethane production. These data, taken with those reported in an accompanying article (RR Wise, AW Naylor 1986 Plant Physiol 83: 278-282) suggest that the superoxide anion radical is generated in cucumber chloroplasts (probably via a Mehler-type reaction) during chilling-enhanced photooxidation. Parallel experiments were conducted on pea, a CR species. Detached pea leaves could only be made to generate ethane in the cold and light if they were pretreated with the herbicide parquat, a known effector of O(2) (-) production. Even so, pea showed no lipid peroxidation for 6 hours, at which time ethane production began and was at a rate equal to that for the chilled and irradiated cucumber leaves. The results indicate that pea has an endogenous mechanism(s) for the removal of toxic oxygen species prior to lipid peroxidation. This mechanism breaks down in pea after 6 hours in the cold, light, and the presence of paraquat.

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References

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